Peanut Butter Cup Ice Cream

cuisinart ice cream maker

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I have to confess to you that I am not much of an ice cream fan.

There I’ve said it.

Anything icy-cold hurts my sensitive teeth and I just have learned I don’t enjoy eating it much.  My family however, makes several runs during the week to Braums, our local dairy store to buy things like Peanut Butter Cup Ice Cream.  I thought maybe I should learn how to make it and save hundreds of dollars each year so I began looking at recipes.



Three weeks ago, this little naughty kitchen toy arrived so I set to work.





So far, I’ve tackled several different versions like Coffee Ice Cream with Chocolate Chunks (Mr. Wonderful’s favorite), Peanut Butter Cup Ice Cream with Peanut Butter cups in it (the kids thought vanilla would be better), Vanilla Toffee Crunch (everyone loved!), and Fresh Strawberry.

I could now buy stock in Braum’s Dairy store because I’m mostly funding them with all the whole milk and cream I’m buying.

I have now established what I think is my perfect vanilla ice cream base for several different ice creams including this Peanut Butter Cup Ice Cream recipe.

Here is how it goes!

To begin, pour one and one half cups of whole milk and one and one-half cups of heavy cream into a medium sized sauce pan.

milk and cream

Add in one-third cup of white sugar and one-third cup of brown sugar,  one teaspoon of vanilla (use PURE vanilla extract, not imitation!), and a pinch of salt.

Whisk it up and turn the heat to medium.  You just want this to start steaming, not really boiling. Make sure you keep whisking it every ten seconds or so, so the bottom doesn’t scorch like milk does.

In a small bowl, add four egg yolks.  Save the whites for after you eat ice cream. You know, the next morning when you’re feeling guilty, you can make an egg white omelet and redeem yourself!

egg yolks

Whisk them up well.

Once your milk/cream mixture steams, ladle about ½ cup of it into the eggs.


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Whisk quickly to incorporate.


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This is calling “tempering” and it keeps the eggs from scrambling if you added them quickly to the hot milk mixture.

Add in another ½ cup of the hot milk mixture.  Whisk.  Now you can pour the egg mixture into the milk mixture safely. Whisk it in quickly.

ice cream custard

Bring the mixture to a steam again and keep whisking it for about ten minutes.


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It will have thickened up enough to coat the back of a spoon.


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Remove it immediately from the heat.  Set a fine mesh strainer over a medium sized bowl.


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Pour the custard into the strainer, and using your whisk, begin whisking to push the custard through strainer to weed out anything grainy that might be in it.

strain custard

Stir in a teaspoon of vanilla and one more cup of cream.


cream in ice cream custard


Cover the custard and put it into the refrigerator for several hours or even overnight.


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Next, turn on your ice cream machine and pour it in!  ( I have this ice cream maker and I love it!)


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Set a time for 15 minutes. At the end of 15 minutes, the ice cream will be like a thick milkshake.


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While that’s mixing, chop up your peanut butter cups.  I used the small wrapped Reeses peanut butter cups.


Peanut Butter Cups


I like them fairly large but you don’t want things TOO large in your ice cream. Note the picture above for the size.  You’ll want roughly about 2 cups of chopped peanut butter cups.  If you don’t like a lot, scale back to a cup and one-half, but why in the WORLD would you do that?

After 15 minutes, add in the chopped peanut butter cups.


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Let it mix to incorporate all the lovely peanut butter cup pieces.

peanut butter cup

This should only take about a minute or two tops.


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Then scoop it into an air-tight container and pop it in the freezer for several hours. We like it best after at least 4 hours or better yet, overnight.


Peanut Butter Cup Ice Cream Closeup


This is delicious.

Trust me.

Peanut Butter Cup Ice Cream

 

Author:

Recipe type: Dessert

  • 1½ cups milk
  • 2½ cups cream (divided)
  • ⅓ cup white granulated sugar
  • ⅓ cup brown sugar
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • Pinch of salt
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 1½ c, chopped peanut butter cups
  1. Combine the milk, 1½ cups of the cream (save the other cup for later), sugar, brown sugar, vanilla and salt in a medium saucepan. Heat the base until it begins to steam, whisking continuously.
  2. When the base begins to steam, pour one- half cup out of the pan and into the egg yolks, whisk immediately.
  3. Add another ½ cup of the milk to the eggs. Whisk.
  4. When completely combined, add the yolk mixture back into the rest of the of the base, and heat until the mixture reaches 170°F, or until it coats the back of a spoon.
  5. Remove immediately from heat and pour through a fine mesh sieve using whisk to push through.
  6. Add in the remaining cup of cold cream and let chill for 3 or 4 hours or overnight.
  7. Pour the base into an ice cream maker and churn according to your ice cream maker manufacturer’s instructions.
  8. When 1 minute remains, add in peanut butter cups and let stir for full minute. Don’t add earlier, as you don’t want to overprocess and break up the peanut butter cups.
  9. Yield: Makes a quart ane one-half of ice cream.
  1. teaspoons instant coffee granules and 1 t. coffee extract to make coffee ice cream
  2. Add 4 oz. of Heath bar crunchies to make toffee ice cream
  3. Sprinkle ¼ c. sugar over 1½ c. sliced strawberries and let set for ½ hour to make strawberry ice cream. Pour in juice and strawberries at 1 minute to go mark.

3.2.2124

 


peanut butter cup ice cream recipe


Check out what other fabulous bloggers made in the way of frozen treats for Food Network’s Summer Soiree this week!

The Hungry Traveler Blog: Banana Coconut Paletas
The Lemon Bowl: Chocolate Peanut Butter Magic Shell
Creative Culinary: Strawberry, Lemon and Basil Sherbet
The Heritage Cook: Grilled Plums and Port Parfaits (Gluten-Free)
TasteBook: Triple Chocolate Mousse Pie
Dishin & Dishes: Peanut Butter Cup Ice Cream
Homemade Delish: Jalapeno and Peach Gelato
Napa Farmhouse 1885: Healthy Chocolate & Greens Fudgsicles
Red or Green: Ice Cream Sandwiches with Frozen Yogurt
The Mom 100: Easy Chocolate Mousse
Weelicious: Fruity Lemonade Ice Pops
Taste with the Eyes: Figs and Sabayon à la Julia Child
Healthy Eats: Puddings, Pops and Pies: 7 Desserts Best Served Cold
In Jennie’s Kitchen: Seven Sensational Frozen Treats
FN Dish: 8 Desserts to Check Off Your Frozen-Treat Bucket List

 

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Asparagus Spinach Coconut Soup | Dishin & Dishes

asparagus spinach coconut milk soup

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A couple of weekends ago, I was watching a cooking show where the hostess was making spring food and an asparagus soup recipe drew me in, except for the butter and heavy cream, both of which I adore, but could really do without on my hips, behind and other parts of my body, if you know what I mean.



If you are one of those tall, lanky thin people who don’t know what I mean….it means it puts WEIGHT on me for gosh sake. Count your blessings!

I decided to re-create the recipe in a healthier sense and oh boy! Mr. Wonderful has fallen in love with this soup!  And the added healthy bonus is just a plus!

Start out by chopping one large bunch of asparagus into one to two inch pieces. Also, chop up two stalks of celery along with one leek and 2 cloves of garlic. Now, if you’re one of those people who makes a face at the sound of the word “leek” be adventurous! Leeks have a more delicate flavor than their cousin the onion, so if you don’t like strong onion flavor or are cooking a dish that an onion might overpower (like this one!), try using a leek instead. To learn how to cut and wash them click here for my leek tutorial.

So to start cooking this soup, add two tablespoons of coconut oil or olive oil into a large pot.  When it’s melted and the heat is up to medium temperature, add in the asparagus, leek and celery and stir for about ten minutes.  Then add in the garlic and stir for one minute more.


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Now add in four cups of vegetable or chicken stock. To make your own chicken stock click here and to make your own vegetable stock, click here. It just might be easier than you think!


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Stir this all around a few times and simmer for about twenty minutes, stirring every five-seven minutes or so.

Then add in in four cups of spinach. I forgot to take a picture!

Now using a ladle, add in enough of this mixture to fill your blender about half way full.


blending hot soups



**IMPORTANT!!!  Any time you blend a hot liquid, let it cool a bit first and then only fill your blender no more than half way full! Remove the lid or the removable clear plastic insert to add things and cover with a dish towel to avoid steam explosions and burning!

Blending asparagus soup


Turn this on and pulse a few times and then turn it on high and let it completely blend until smooth, then pour it into a bowl or another large sauce pan and repeat with the remaining asparagus/spinach mixture until all is pureed.

Next, pour it back into a clean pot and gently heat again over medium heat.


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Add in one 13.5 ounce can of coconut (or light coconut) milk and stir and bring back to a simmer and simmer for about five minutes more letting it thicken up slightly.

If you prefer SUPER silky soup, pour through a fine sieve.


sieve strain asparagus soup


I usually skip this step, however, because it’s pretty smooth and I prefer to keep the tiny bits of fiber in for more health benefits!

Garnish with creme fraiche, or Greek yogurt  and some blanched tips of asparagus stalks for a beautiful presentation!


Photo Mar 28, 4 45 46 AM (1)


I was worried Mr. Wonderful wouldn’t like this soup but he raved about it for days. I’m making some more tonight while asparagus low prices abound!

Happy Spring!

Asparagus Spinach Coconut Soup

 

Author:

Cuisine: Soup

  • Ingredients
  • 2 T. coconut oil (or olive oil)
  • 1 large bunch asparagus, ends trimmed, cut into 2-inch pieces
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1 large leek, white and light green only, chopped and rinsed
  • 3 cups spinach
  • 4 cups vegetable or chicken stock
  • 1 13.5 can light or regular coconut milk
  • ½ t. Kosher salt
  • ¼ t. ground black pepper
  1. In a large stockpot, heat the oil over medium heat.
  2. Add the asparagus, celery, and leek and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 10 minutes.
  3. Add garlic and stir for one minute
  4. Add the vegetable or chicken stock, then reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes.
  5. Add spinach and stir for 1 minute, just to wilt
  6. Working in batches, fill blender to half full with mixture. Take off plastic clear lid but leave on main lid of blender. Cover hole with a dish towel and quickly pulse a few times, then turn blender on and let run for 1 minute to puree well. Pour into a clean large sauce pan.
  7. Repeat with remaining mixture until all your original pot is pureed and in sauce pan.
  8. Add the coconut milk and simmer for another 2-3 minutes minutes.
  9. Season with salt and pepper and adjust to taste.
  10. Add the spinach to the soup and let wilt for about 1 minute. In batches, pour the soup into a blender and blend on high until smooth. (Alternatively, use an immersion blender and puree in the pot.) Stir well before transferring to 12 small teacups and serve hot.
  11. IMPORTANT: It’s important when blending hot liquids to only fill half full in blender and leave the top opening open to allow steam to release. Failure to do so can result in hot explosions and burning!

3.2.2925

Love asparagus and want MORE recipes featuring their lovely green stalks? Check out what other bloggers are offering for Food Network’s Spring Sensation Sides below!

The Lemon Bowl: 20 Asparagus Recipes for Spring
Feed Me Phoebe: White Asparagus with Herby Sabayon Sauce
Dishing with Divya: Mock Guacamole with Asparagus
Dishin & Dishes: Asparagus Spinach Coconut Soup
Creative Culinary: Grilled Asparagus with Garlic and Parmesan
Jeanette’s Healthy Living: Low Carb Pasta with Asparagus Pancetta and Pine Nuts
Weelicious: Italian Asparagus Sticks
The Heritage Cook: Asparagus Caprese Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette
Napa Farmhouse 1885: Roasted Asparagus Nicoise
Red or Green: Spicy Roasted Asparagus & Leek Soup
Swing Eats: Roasted Fingerling Potatoes and Asparagus with Rosemary
The Cultural Dish: Asparagus Milanese
The Wimpy Vegetarian: Asparagus Carbonara with Garlic Crumbs
Taste with the Eyes: Savory Matzo Brei with Asparagus and Smoked Salmon
The Mom 100: It’s Simple Roasted Asparagus with Shallots and Parmesan
FN Dish: The Asparagus Motto: The Simpler, The Better

 

 

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Homemade Ravioli | Dishin & Dishes

Ravioli

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A few months back, I traveled to Michigan to stay with my Mom for a week who had just had surgery and help cook and clean and generally help Dad with whatever we needed to do to keep her planted on the couch all week.

While I was there, Mr. Wonderful made homemade ravioli.



Without me.

Seriously? I cook all week, every week for the man and he chooses the week that I’m away to make homemade ravioli?

Hmph.

Well, ever since he sent me those gloriously wonderful cell phone messages with photos of his homemade ravioli, I’ve wanted to make them again.


Ravioli_with_pesto_and_tomatoes.JPG




You know, as in, make them again since I would be AROUND to taste them?

So yesterday after church we knocked out a TON of them and they were SO good.

I have been wanting to play around with a ratio of semolina flour to regular flour since we first made pasta. I really like more of a “bite” to my pasta than the regular flour recipes offered and I believe I found the perfect ratio yesterday. Since we were making ravioli, we added in some olive oil to help it be pliable for filling and sealing and I played around with the filling recipe as well which turned out fabulous!

This brand of semolina flour is widely available at most stores and it is what I used.


red Mill Semolina flour


I made a double recipe as well, because if you’re going to go to all that trouble, why not freeze some for later? We laid them out on cookie sheets lined with parchment paper and froze them solid then popped them into freezer bags for an easy but delicious meal another night!

I also tried out a new toy I’d ordered, and I can’t tell you how convenient this Ravioli mold turned out to be.

Norpro ravioli mold


It is the perfect width for the noodles that rolled out of our KitchenAid pasta rollers. You can absolutely positively make ravioli without one of these but it’ll be a bit more work.

I just used a large bowl to make my dough in but you can start it on the counter.


Flour eggs pasta dough


I used one cup of semolina flour and two cups of all-purpose flour and whisked them together then cracked in two eggs (I doubled the recipe this time). Using a fork, mix the eggs together in the well they are sitting in, then add in 1/4 cup olive oil, and 1/2 cup of water right into the same well.

Pull the flour into the egg mixture with the fork a little at a time while mixing.

Continue to mix with the fork until it becomes workable for your hands then roll the dough around to get any loosed flour. If you need a tad more water, add it one tablespoon at a time until the dough is soft but not sticky.Turn it out onto a floured cutting board or clean counter top and knead it several times until it becomes smooth. Flatten it into a disk and wrap it in plastic wrap and let it sit for thirty minutes to let the glutens relax.

Follow this post for rolling out the dough.

 

We used our KitchenAid pasta roller attachment, but you could use a countertop roller or even a rolling pin, if you’re feeling ambitious. We first cut our disk into 4 equal sizes pieces and rolled out each one. The width of our pasta roller was absolutely perfect for the ravioli mold, and we only had to cut square corners (work the cut off sections back into the next piece of dough you use.

Ravioli makers

Roll the dough thin but not too thin. On our KitchenAid pasta rollers, we stopped on the #4 setting (On KitchenAid #1 is the thickest and #8 is the smallest).

We laid our ravioli mold (we have this one) next to the dough and leaving about ½ inch extra on the ends, we cut two pieces to fit.

Ravioli molds come in different sizes. The one we have makes the smaller ravioli (1 ½ inches each) but you can also buy them in larger sizes. I prefer the smaller ones for nite-size purposes, but I may have to buy the larger size as well!

Here is how a ravioli mold works. You lay your first layer of dough over top of the metal side.

The metal side has teeth outlining each ravioli square and all the way around the entire thing.

After the first layer of dough is on the metal piece, you gently place the plastic mold (with the round bubbles on the bottom) right on top of the dough and again, gently press down.

 

The plastic bubbles press the dough through the holes in the metal piece to form indentions in your dough for you to uniformly fill your ravioli.

I also put my herbed ricotta and spinach filling into a pastry bag to pipe it into the ravioli dimples I created with the plastic mold to help make the filling uniform in volume on each square. You could use a baggie with the corner cut off or even a spoon though.

To make the filling, dump a 15 ounce container of whole milk ricotta into a mixing bowl. Take about 6 cups of fresh spinach leaves and chop them up. Also, chop up about 8 basil leaves.Add a tablespoon of olive oil to a skillet and bring it up to medium heat. Add the spinach for only about a minute or two until it begins to wilt but is still bright green.

Remove it to the mixing bowl with the ricotta and add in the basil along with one cup of grated parmesan cheese, one beaten egg , a clove of chopped garlic and some salt and pepper.Mix it up really well and then spoon it into your baggie or piping bag.

Pipe it into the indentions on the bottom layer of pasta.

Take a pastry brush (or just use one finger) and brush water in between each line of ravioli, or anyplace that will be sealed for each ravioli.

Lay the top layer of dough over top.

Use a rolling pin to go over the entire thing, pressing down firmly.

This will cause the teeth to cut the ravioli through the dough. Don’t worry about flattening out the filling because the top that you are rolling over is going to be the BOTTOM of the ravioli and it should be flat.

Once you can clearly see the teeth all the way through the dough, Pull off the excess dough from the edges.

And then flip the metal piece upside down and give it a good shake a couple of times to dislodge the ravioli from the mold

A few of ours had to be helped by gently pressing them out but it left a little dent in the top of the ravioli.

Ugly ravioli makes me upset!

Not really. It still tastes fine.

To cook these, bring a large pot of water to boil. They only need about 3-4 minutes tops. I used a spider to gently stir them to make sure they didn’t stick to each other and then to lift them out into a bowl afterward. I also only boiled about a dozen at a time because you don’t want to overcrowd the pot.

We tossed them with homemade pesto I had in the freezer due to the enormous amounts of basil I grew last year. While the ravioli was in process, I added about 20 cherry tomatoes into my small iron skillet with a tablespoon of olive oil and cooked them until they were soft and the skin was blistering in places. It leant just the perfect amount of acidity to the richly filled ravioli and the pesto.


I am so excited to start experimenting with new fillings now like mushrooms, butternut squash, roasted vegetables and seafood.

Homemade pasta is so unbelievably delicious.

 

The Best Homemade Ravioli Ever

 

Author:

  • 1 c. semolina flour
  • 2 c. all-purpose flour
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ t. salt
  • ¼ c. olive oil
  • ½ c. water
  • FOR THE FILLING:
  • 1 T. olive oil
  • 1 (15 oz) container whole milk ricotta cheese
  • 6 c. fresh spinach leaves, chopped
  • 8 basil leaves, chopped
  • 1 c. parmesan cheese, grated
  • 1 whole egg
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 1 t. salt
  • ½ t. pepper
  • 1 c. basil pesto
  • 20 cherry tomatoes, blistered or ½ c. chopped sun-dried tomatoes
  1. Using a fork, mix the eggs together in the well they are sitting in, then add in ¼ cup olive oil, and ½ cup of water right into the same well.
  2. Pull the flour into the egg mixture with the fork a little at a time while mixing.
  3. Continue to mix with the fork until it becomes workable for your hands then roll the dough around to get any loosed flour. If you need a tad more water, add it one tablespoon at a time until the dough is soft but not sticky.
  4. Turn it out onto a floured cutting board or clean counter top and knead it several times until it becomes smooth.
  5. Flatten it into a disk and wrap it in plastic wrap and let it sit for thirty minutes to let the glutens relax.
  6. Unwrap your dough and cut it into 4 equal pieces
  7. Cover three of these with a bowl to prevent them from drying out. Then take the fourth one and kind of pull it out into a sort of rectangle. Sprinkle it with flour.
  8. Put your pasta attachment on or use your pasta roller set to the widest setting
  9. Run pasta through
  10. Take it out and fold it in half lengthwise and run it through again. (Fold the two short ends together).
  11. Take it out and fold it in half lengthwise and run it through again. (Fold the two short ends together).
  12. After your fourth time (on that setting), change the pasta roller to the next size smaller (setting 2 on the KitchenAid wheel). Run it through the first time just as it is, then three times more after that folding it in half again long ways after each run. Then change your roller setting one size smaller to 3.
  13. Continue on to number 8 setting.
  14. Cut dough into one foot sections
  15. Place dough over ravioli press and use metal insert to press indentions into bottom sheet of dough.
  16. When filling is done – pipe or spoon into each indention.
  17. Place top sheet of pasta over top and roll a rolling pin over top to cut.
  18. Empty onto cookie sheets lined with cornmeal
  1. Heat olive oil in large skillet and saute spinach until just bright green and wilted
  2. Add all other ingredients to large bowl and mix well.
  3. Use piping bag or teaspoon to fill indentions in ravioli
  1. Bring large pot of generously salted water to boil.
  2. Add ravioli (about 12-18 at a time)
  3. Let cook 3½-4 minutes
  4. Lift out with spider or slotted spoon
  5. Continue cooking until all are cooked
  1. Add one tablespoon of olive oil to hot skillet,
  2. Add about 20 cherry tomatoes and continue to stir until they collapse and begin to burst and brown, about 10 minutes.
  3. Mix pasta with pesto and tomatoes and toss.

3.2.2925

If you like this, check out what other wonderful food bloggers are making for Food Network’s Comfort Food Fest below!

Feed Me Phoebe: Sesame Soba Noodle Salad with Cabbage Slaw
The Mom 100: Creamy Goat Cheese and Spinach Linguine
The Cultural Dish: Homemade Pasta and Top 3 Light and Easy Pasta Recipes
Taste with the Eyes: A Unique Pasta Made of Black Beans – Gluten-Free, Lower-Carb
Napa Farmhouse 1885: Ravioli with Asparagus, Green Pea Sauce & Sauteed Scallops
Red or Green: Pasta Cacio e Pepe (pasta with pecorino & black pepper)
In Jennie’s Kitchen: Spaghetti Limone
Dishin & Dishes: The Best Homemade Ravioli Ever
FN Dish: 5 Back-Pocket Pastas That Always Have Your Back


How to make ravioli


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Homemade Vegetable Stock | Dishin & Dishes

homemade vegetable stock recipe

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Starting in January, you may remember Mr. Wonderful and I were doing a Daniel Fast or a 21 day plant- based diet including no meat, dairy and only whole grains, vegetables and fruits.

Many of the soups and recipes we made called for vegetable stock.  I have made chicken stock plenty of times (see how to make chicken stock with your leftover roasted chicken carcasses here). I have a shelf in my freezer devoted to housing plastic tubs of chicken stock. I haven’t bought a box of chicken stock in a long time.



But I couldn’t use that for our fast so I got to work making some vegetable stock.

homemade vegetable broth

There is no reason for buying it! You probably have all the ingredients laying around your kitchen.  Oh, and by the way, if you peel potatoes and carrots on a regular basis?  Toss the peels into a gallon sized freezer bag and collect them. They are great to add to any stock to bump up the flavor! Also hang onto your celery leaf tops of the celery if you don’t eat them (I LOVE celery leaves in my dishes!).  Toss them in with the peels and you can practically make stock with the stuff you normally throw out!

Today I made the vegetable stock with a stock pot filled with cold water (about 3 quarts of water). The easy thing about making stock is, you don’t even have to peel stuff!  I DO give my onions, carrots and celery a rinse just in case they have dirt on them.  Cut the onions in half (peels and all!) and then toss in 4 carrots that you’d just broken in half or thirds. Also break up 3-4 celery stalks. Leave on the leaves! They add delicious flavor! add in some garlic cloves (about 3 or 4) that you’ve smashed with a knife.


Photo Jan 16, 10 17 13 PM


I realize that the celery and carrots look “dirty” in the above photo but that’s just dried spices I added. In the summer I would add fresh herbs out of my garden, but here in the cold months of winter I add about 1/2 teaspoon each of thyme, rosemary and parsley to the pot.

I took one last look at my vegetable crisper and decided to go ahead and add in 2 scrawny stalks of kale that were getting close to hitting the trash can and a couple of button mushrooms. Even if you don’t like mushrooms, I encourage you to try them in stock. They add a wonderful richness to the broth.

Then you just pop the lid on, leaving a little space to vent on one edge and just barely simmer it for an hour.

Once it’s simmered for an hour, take the pot off the stove and let it cool off somewhat. Then pour it through a fine strainer into a bowl.


image


You can press on the vegetables with a wooden spoon or rubber spatula which will release more veggie-rich liquid into the broth.

begetable stock

See how nice and rich and dark the broth has become? That’s flavor baby….pure flavor.

Then I pop this into the refrigerator (uncovered) for an hour or two to completely cool. It freezes beautifully so you can put it into freezer-safe containers and freeze it to use another time or if you plan on using it soon, a mason jar or two will work also! Keep it stored in the refrigerator until you decide to use it.


vegetable stock mason jar


The difference this makes in any soup you make will be significant. Try making your own broth or stock next time and save yourself some money!

**For an extra flavorful broth, roughly chop and saute your vegetables in a little olive oil until they begin to brown before adding water, then complete the remainder of steps. Alternatively, you can roast the vegetables in the oven as well to brown.

Homemade Vegetable Stock (or Broth)

 

Author:

Recipe type: Soup

  • 4 large carrots
  • 4 stalks celery
  • 3-4 garlic cloves
  • 1 onion
  • 2 stalks kale
  • 2-4 button mushrooms
  • ½ t. dried thyme or several sprigs of fresh thyme
  • ½ t. dried parsley or several sprigs of fresh parsley
  • ½ t. dried rosemary or 2 sprigs fresh rosemary
  • 1 bay leaf
  1. Break celery and carrots into thirds and add to 3 quarts water in heavy bottomed stock pot.
  2. cut onion in thirds and add to pot (no need to peel)
  3. smash garlic with side of knife and add to pot (no need to peel)
  4. Add kale and mushrooms to pot (no need to cut)
  5. Turn heat to high on burner just until the pot comes to a boil then reduce heat to where it barely simmers.
  6. Simmer one hour, pour through fine strainer into large bowl and chill in refrigerator one hour.
  7. Pour into freezer safe containers and freeze.

3.2.2925

 

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